House subcommittee aims to address academic and attendance challenges

Insights gained from the impact of COVID-19 on K-12 education indicate the negative consequences of prolonged school closures and the necessity for increased spending and accountability for federal relief funding, according to lawmakers and panelists who spoke at a House Subcommittee on Healthcare and Financial Services hearing on Tuesday.

Although some speakers criticized decision-making during the pandemic, others emphasized the importance of addressing the academic challenges moving forward. Widely agreed upon solutions include high-intensity tutoring and combatting chronic absenteeism.

During the hearing, Nat Malkus, a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, explained to lawmakers that the slow progress in improving attendance following school closures means attendance rates may not return to pre-pandemic levels until 2030. He also noted that absenteeism had a more severe impact on lower-performing schools with high poverty rates.

“Overcoming learning loss is dependent on addressing absenteeism, which can hinder interventions such as tutoring or extended learning time,” said Malkus.

Other articles

Post Image
Education
House education committee passes resolution to eliminate Title IX final rule

Key Highlights: A resolution aiming to negate the recent final Title IX rule by …

Read More
Post Image
Education
FOX Weather offers MSU’s Morris internship, mentoring with national weather broadcaster

Sadie Morris (Submitted photo) Greenwood, Indiana native Sadie Morris, majoring …

Read More
Post Image
Education
Testing Devices for Lead Used on Thousands of Children Found to Be Faulty

A firm specializing in lead poisoning testing has reached an agreement to settle …

Read More